How to Follow an Elimination Diet Without Eliminating Your Healthy Relationship With Food

Are you at the point of not knowing what the heck is going on with your body and you’re ready to try an elimination diet? Or have you been on an elimination diet before that made you question your entire relationship with food? Unfortunately, elimination diets can often lead to a more damaging relationship with food if you’re not properly educated on the purpose, duration, and logistics of the diet, if you’re not following up with a healthcare professional, or if you experience weight changes while on the diet.

For anyone who has ever struggled with their relationship with food or their body, read this article before embarking on any kind of elimination diet.

Eat Because it Tastes Good

This is what we call normal eating. It’s eating more some days because the food tastes good, and perhaps eating less other days because you were busy or didn’t have food available. It’s trusting that your body can regulate your weight and you don’t need to work so hard to deny yourself certain pleasures.

Erase the guilt and the shame and just enjoy your food when it tastes good.

What Can I Eat if Everything is Toxic?: Arsenic

This post is the first in a series titled: “What Can I Eat if Everything is Toxic?”. I’m going to very basically explore different claims about “toxic” foods and determine if you need to be worried about the health threats from these food items, if you should simply proceed with caution, or if there is no health threat determined. This week, I’m starting with arsenic.

Repeat What We Don’t Repair

It’s okay to keep repeating the same mistakes. We can’t make changes instantly. We can’t repair habits or beliefs that may have taken years to develop. It may have taken a lifetime to develop. And it’s not just going to stop overnight. Sure, we don’t want to keep making the same mistakes. We think once we know better, we should do better. But the process can be slow. And it is not linear. You may be doing well for months or years, and then one day you’re struck by the same thought processes or behaviors you thought you were done with. It doesn’t mean you’ve failed, it just means there’s some more work to be done. We all will always have work to do.

Trigger Warnings

Life doesn’t come with a trigger warning (nor should it), but many things on the internet do have a trigger warning. Don’t seek these things out when you’re feeling vulnerable. It’s a sure way to feel worse and potentially lead you to act on your feelings. That’s kind of the point of the warning…